Out From Under the Umbrella

playing in the rain

Proof?!? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Proof!

13 Comments

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Yeah….I don’t think the Word of God means what you think it means.

We don’t even have evidence that the Word of God is the word of god.  Perhaps no one reads that little preface to each book in their Bible?  That should be enough to at least raise a red flag – to make a person question certain presuppositions.  Maybe that preface isn’t in everyone’s Bible.  *shrug*

When each book is prefaced with, “We don’t know when this book was written – maybe sometime between here and here.  We don’t really know who wrote this book – it could possibly be the namesake but more likely someone who knew them or knew of them”, how is that not enough to make you dig a little further?  And how is it that you put so much trust in it’s divine inspiration?  J.K. Rowling was inspired to write Harry Potter.  People have vivid imaginations.  That does not divine anything make.

But when you are told time and again that it is sinful to even question the nature of the Bible because it’s God don’t have nothin’ to prove – why, even the rocks cry out his praise – and faith in the absence of evidence is upheld as a noble endeavor you find comfort in not asking the questions.  Questions like ‘when was the last time you heard a rock cry out anything’?

Meh, who needs proof?

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13 thoughts on “Proof?!? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Proof!

  1. I finally got around to watching the Nye/Ham debate, every time Ham mentioned “christian science” I cringed. I was raised in that religion, and my dear Mr. Ham, “christian science” (regardless of the size of the “c” and “s”) does NOT mean what you seem to think it means.

    If anything Ms. Eddy’s “divinely inspired” (liberally borrowed and dangerously clobbered together) religion has made me demand even more proof. Real, solid, science based, repeatable evidence… not someone who claims to have had a healing based on vague non-medically-verified symptoms.

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    • I never understood the concept of not valuing the medical community in favor of strictly prayer.

      Question: If a Christian Scientist is gravely ill and prays for healing and dies when a medical intervention could have saved their life is that, in the minds of their loved ones, simply because God didn’t want them to live?

      I’m very wary of anything with the words “christian” and “science” in the same sentence, especially as regards medicine.

      As Hambone puts it, he starts with the presupposition of God and the Bible and makes the “science”(and I use that term loosely) fit.

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      • Question: If a Christian Scientist is gravely ill and prays for healing and dies when a medical intervention could have saved their life is that, in the minds of their loved ones, simply because God didn’t want them to live?

        That’s a complicated one, and this is the “short” answer and I admit a heavy bias.

        It is not “God didn’t want them to live” it is why didn’t they heal themselves? what was WRONG WITH THEIR THOUGHT?! What bigger shortcomings did they have? Clearly they were “not prepared” for the “challenge.”

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        • I see. Not too dissimilar, then, to any other fundamentalist sect. In Southern Baptist language (although most of them do seek out actual medical advice/attention) if a person isn’t healed then it’s possibly because they a) didn’t have enough faith, b) had some “hidden” sin in their life, or c) it was a perfect healing – they’ve gone on to be in heaven – rather than divine healing here on earth.

          At any rate it leaves the impression that if they weren’t divinely healed it was somehow their own fault.

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          • It isn’t so much about “faith” as it is in their ability to “know the Truth” about themselves and the “unreality” of their situation. If someone remarks they don’t look well, the person may be charged with “aggressive mental suggestion” which may undermine the person’s ability to heal.

            If/when they do pass on, the appropriate platitudes are dragged out, it was “their time” (even if it was TOTALLY PREVENTABLE), they’ve “gone to be with God,” they have “continued on their Spiritual Journey,” they “will be with us forever in our hearts.”

            Of course if they do happen to pull through (minus medical intervention) it is praised as an amazing healing. If they get “medical assistance” it is usually kept very quiet.

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  2. “Oh, look kiddies. Here we have a picture of a farmer from the stone age riding a tame Triceratops.”

    It isn’t the likes of Ken Ham that does my head in – he is a straight up and down wack-job – but the numbers of adults that buy into this shit is simply astounding.

    And the US once had a President…dear ole George double you, who reckoned god communicated with him.
    Also, no biggy. But the scary thing is, people voted him into office.

    WTF….y’all….

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    • I think maybe I should be insulted. I used to fall for it all – hook, line, and sinker – believing such foolishness as seashells on mountain tops to be proof for a global flood. *blush*

      As for good ole W believing god communicated with him…well…I used to think he communicated with me, too. I must do a post on that to elaborate. I never thought I heard him audibly, mind you. Not like he was talking to me, but communicating nonetheless. So, yes, people did vote him into office because there are loads of people out there who believe the same thing and don’t find it strange in the least. Even some atheists (maybe, hopefully, just one) won’t vote for someone who doesn’t believe they answer to a power higher than themselves. Unfortunately they are deluded into thinking it should be a god rather than the people the president represents.

      Yes, I was a fanatic. A Fruit Loop.

      It was only when I began paying attention to that which I was paying attention to that I came to other conclusions.

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